Exhibits

Clicker Quiz: An Interactive Review of Key Concepts for a Grade

ABSTRACT

In the medical surgical courses in Brooks College of Health School of Nursing there is a very long lecture once a week. We try many methods to enhance student engagement in this didactic nursing lecture. On Blackboard there are power points with key learning concepts; learning guides, and readings from the text and current articles. The students are encouraged to prepare before coming to class, however a 3 plus hour lecture can really drag on and on. We do have inactive learning exercises with in the course of the lecture but felt we needed a little something else. The birth of the clicker quizzes. Clicker quizzes consist of 10 NCLEX type multiple choice questions on the material just covered in class. With the immediate response after each question the students feel they have reinforcement of the concepts and faculty feel we have a gauge of their understanding of the concepts just presented. It also tends to maintain a student’s attention during the lecture. The rapidly graded in class clicker quiz provides prompt feedback to the concepts just taught.

PRESENTER(S) – Linda Connelly & Cynthia Cummings

BIOGRAPHY

Cindy Cummings and Linda Connelly are professors of nursing at Brooks College of Health School of Nursing. Cindy is a Critical Care Nurse. Linda is an Operating Room/ Emergency room Nurse. Cindy is an EdD and Linda has a PhD both have advanced degrees in nursing, Cindy as a Clinical Nurse Specialist and Linda as a Family Nurse Practitioner. They both taught at FSCJ together before coming to UNF. Cindy and Linda teach the medical surgical course which is the foundation of nursing practice.

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The Library Commons: A Platform for Student Engagement via Technologically Enhanced Collaboration Stations

ABSTRACT

Responding to changes in teaching pedagogies where active learning, group projects, and flipped classrooms are more common, the Library makes it easier for students who wish to connect with each other and their professors to complete assigned work and improve learning outcomes. Encouraging students to gather information, share knowledge, and solve problems together using technology can contribute to building collaboration skills and may lead to deeper learning, better understanding, and increased student success. The Media:scape collaboration stations with single and dual monitors available to faculty and students in the new Library Commons makes information sharing among four to six students per station quick and seamless. Students can increase their productivity when working in group settings by sharing the information from their individual devices, such as laptops, cell phone, and tablets on a common platform that can be accessed and viewed by others.

This presentation will demonstrate how students are using technology in the library to collaborate on projects, study together, and share ideas. It will offer examples of how faculty might use the technology in the collaboration stations to engage students in the learning process.

PRESENTER(S) – Stephanie F. Race, Lisandra Carmichael, & Paul Mosley

BIOGRAPHY

Stephanie F. Race is the Head of Research and Faculty Outreach at the UNF Library. She has over 25 years of library and teaching experience and was instrumental in Florida’s first Distance Learning Library Initiative.

Lisandra R. Carmichael is the Director of Public Services at the UNF Library. She is an experienced educator and academic librarian whose research interests include succession planning and management programs and library spaces at academic libraries.

Paul Mosley is an Associate University Librarian and the Head of Access Services at the UNF Library. His research interests include library designs and user services.

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Selfies and Mapping and Tweets…Oh My: New Strategies for Monitoring Field-Based Learning Experiences

ABSTRACT

This presentation details implementation of new pedagogical strategies for monitoring field-based learning experiences. As practical-based field experiences are routinely part of higher education instruction, educators are tasked with seeking effective ways to supervise and evaluate these learning activities. These tasks can become more problematic when presented via online instruction. While the integration of meaningful field-based projects may seem challenging for classes that are taught via online delivery methods, the infusion of such pedagogical practices can be quite compatible with online delivery. Various evaluative efforts can serve to shorten the transactional distance associated with supervising and assessing field-based learning experiences via online instruction. This presentation will provide engaging examples and support for guiding a variety of field-based projects. The theoretical basis for the projects identified in this presentation adheres to the tenants of quality online design, which are anchored in instruction, student-centered learning, situated learning, and evoking principles of project-based learning. This presentation will provide examples based on effective field project implementation aimed at elevating obstacles associated with pedagogical content delivery in through online instructional methods. Particular attention is given to providing authentic and meaningful assessment, while fostering critical thinking and encouraging student reflection, while promoting interdisciplinary collaboration and application.

PRESENTER(S) – Jason W. Lee, Terence W. Cavanaugh, Jennifer J. Kane, & Elizabeth A. Gregg

BIOGRAPHY

Jason W. Lee, PhD, is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of Sport Management at the University of North Florida. Dr. Lee maintains an active research agenda in the areas of sport brand management and visual identity in sport. Dr. Lee has been published in a wide variety of academic journals including and has edited multiple textbooks Branded: Branding in Sport Business, Sport and Criminal Behavior, and Policy and Governance in Sport: Issues, Organizations, and Practical Application (with additional works under contract—including the co-authored book Sport & Visual Identity).

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Teaching Content Knowledge and Process Skills: Getting the Right Blend of Instruction

ABSTRACT

Traditionally, the lecture based classroom focused primarily on content delivery and content retention. While a high degree of content knowledge in one’s field of study is important to employers, many employers also expect applicants to possess a high level of process skills (Communication, Teamwork, Organization, Leadership/Management, Information Processing, Critical Thinking, and Problem Solving). Providing a venue to develop, practice, and utilize these process skills in the academic setting is essential to preparing our graduates for employment. This presentation will be focused on how a Hybrid or Blended learning environment can be utilized to provide the right Blend of content knowledge and process skill instruction. The presenter will share experiences from a recent Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) 3 day workshop attended this summer.

PRESENTER(S) – Peter Magyari 

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Magyari is an Associate Professor in the Brooks College of Health and Director of the Undergraduate Exercise Science Program. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Florida in the area of Exercise Physiology and has been a faculty member at the University of North Florida since 2006.

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Tweet With Them, Not at Them: Social Media Listening as a Form of Student Engagement

ABSTRACT

Social media and networking tools such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram are often used by groups to communicate information to their constituents. Over the past two years, UNF’s Thomas G. Carpenter Library has used its social media accounts not only to communicate, but also to listen. By monitoring keywords, hashtags, and geotags, the Library has kept tabs on what has been said about our services, resources, spaces, staff, and more. The act of listening has also allowed us to begin conversations with our audience, specifically students, in a fun and engaging way. This presentation will share the variety of exchanges and informal data points that have been generated by using social media listening, as well as how the Library plans to move forward.

PRESENTER(S) – Maria D. Atilano

BIOGRAPHY

Maria Atilano is the Marketing and Outreach Librarian at the University of North Florida’s Thomas G. Carpenter Library in Jacksonville, Florida. She began working in academic libraries in 2002 as a student employee while studying at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Before becoming a librarian, Maria held staff positions as Library Services Specialist in Public Services and Sr. Library Services Associate in Special Collections at UNF. She graduated with her MLIS from Florida State University in 2012. Maria’s professional interests include social media, marketing, graphic design, student outreach, instruction, and reference services.

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Using Social Media as a Tool for Student Engagement and Professional Development

ABSTRACT

This presentation showcases a unique and innovative course activity for use in live, hybrid, and/or online classes across a variety of academic disciplines. As social media become more ubiquitous within our culture and society, college students face deliberations regarding their online identity management, particularly when it comes to the perceptions of their professionalism. Mindful practice when engaging online becomes necessitated as students pursue internships, graduate school, and employment opportunities. It has become increasingly exigent that college students receive educational training and awareness on constructive uses of social media that will enhance, rather than deter, their professional presence and networking capacity. With this in mind, this presentation will outline and discuss a versatile course activity entitled Professional Promotion via Social Media: Engaging your online network. The goal of this activity is for students to matriculate from being purely social users of popular social networks to professional users who use these platforms as expert arenas. In addition, this lesson also affords them the opportunity to better understand a wide variety of online engagement strategies that are beneficial best practices in social media which comprise effective social media strategy for numerous professional purposes, thus expanding their repertoire of skills.

PRESENTER(S) – Margaret Stewart

BIOGRAPHY

Margaret C. Stewart is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at University of North Florida. She has a Ph.D. in Communications Media and Instructional Technology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP), a M.A. in Professional Communication and a B.A in Communication from La Salle University in Philadelphia. Her research focuses on social media and emerging communication technologies, particularly among military-affiliated and sports-athlete populations. She has published in Communication Reports, The Journal of Technologies in Society, and The Journal of Communications Media. Dr. Stewart is a certified social media strategist and trainer for the National Institute of Social Media (NISM).

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