5-Minute-Pitches

BRIDGING THE GAP: INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION FOR SIGNED LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS


ABSTRACT

Within the field of signed language interpreting, there is a noticeable gap between the skills students are equipped with when they graduate from an Interpreter Education Program (IEP) and the skills they need to be effective in the workforce. Traditionally, IEPs have been delivered face-to-face, and have incorporated practical skill development, similar to other practice professions (i.e., nursing, mental health counseling). However, with the growth of distance learning, many IEPs are converting to online delivery without considering the pedagogy necessary to teach these practical skills, and the gap has continued to widen. To bridge that gap, the UNF ASL/English Interpreting program has entered into interdisciplinary, collaborative relationships with other programs on campus to provide authentic interpreting experience not only for interpreting students but also for other future professionals who may work with interpreters in their careers. These practical experiences also bring in Deaf community members who can educate the students about how to work with Deaf people that they may encounter in their future practice. The innovative collaboration between programs and the local community has provided rich learning experiences for students and allows students from multiple disciplines to experience authentic learning within a safe, simulated environment.

PRESENTER(S) – Laura Jackson

BIOGRAPHY

Laura Jackson, MA; SC:L, CI, CT, is an Instructor in the ASL/English Interpreting program. She received her BA in Deaf Education/Elementary Education from Flagler College, and her MA in Linguistics from Gallaudet University. She has been a nationally certified interpreter for more than ten years. Mrs. Jackson has also completed Masters level coursework in International Development, which led to her partnership with the Jamaica Association for the Deaf in Kingston, Jamaica, where she worked to improve services for the Jamaican Deaf community. She has completed extensive training in online teaching, including a Master Online Teaching certification program.

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BRINGING THE WORLD TO CAMPUS: THE USE OF VIDEOCONFERENCING TO AUGMENT STUDENT LEARNING


ABSTRACT

The use of videoconferencing technology has made a significant impact in the teaching and learning taking place in my classes at UNF. In an effort to increase student engagement, each course includes an opportunity for students to participate in a video learning conversation with an established leader in field of education policy and practice.

Recently, in our summer Educational Policy class, students spoke with Dr. Edward Spencer, former Vice President for Student Affairs at Virginia Tech. The students were able to ask questions and exchange valuable insight into developing educational policy and overcoming challenges/tragedies in a K-20 setting. This Fall, we will continue this student-centered practice by conducting “virtual interviews” with school leaders throughout the nation as they share best practices.

Research shows a positive relationship between the uses of interactive learning technology and student engagement and learning outcomes (Chen, Lambert & Guidry, 2010). The use of this innovative technology on the UNF campus allows students to learn from leaders in the field and to develop relationships and open lines of communication not possible with a mere textbook, PowerPoint or print article.

PRESENTER(S) – Matthew A. Ohlson

BIOGRAPHY

Matthew Ohlson has a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Policy with a specialization in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Florida. He also received comprehensive leadership training from the New York City Leadership Academy and the The Schlechty/Hohmann Principals Academy. His K-12 experience includes roles as a 15-year teacher and school leader in the Boston Public Schools and the Florida Global School. In higher education, Dr. Ohlson served as a clinical instructor at the University of Florida, Director of the nationally recognized C.A.M.P. mentoring program and leadership facilitator at the Lastinger Center for Learning. Matthew has also conducted comprehensive program evaluation for state agencies and helped to develop the new Florida Education Leadership Exam (FELE). Most recently, he served as an educational consultant with the Florida Department of Education, training educators and leaders throughout the state as they transition to the new curriculum standards.

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OBSERVATIONS THROUGH PHOTOVOICE: ENGAGED, AUTHENTIC LEARNING IN THE LECTURE HALL AND BEYOND


ABSTRACT

This presentation outlines a pilot project for engaging students in a large survey-style introductory course in a creative, participatory, semester-long project using digital photographic images. “Observations through Photovoice” invites Introduction to Anthropology students to respond to exploratory themes in anthropology by taking digital photographs of their surroundings. At the start of the semester, students are asked to generate photographs based on a very broad and central concept in anthropology: socialization. As students are gradually introduced to more complex social themes (gender, “race”, and kinship, for example), they are periodically asked to return to their photographs in order to further classify and contextualize their images and potentially add to their collection. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of basic concepts in anthropology while simultaneously experimenting with contemporary qualitative research methods. The dynamic nature of “Observations through Photovoice” engages learners from diverse modalities (visual, linguistic, kinesthetic, analytical, and global learners) and offers authentic learning opportunities beyond the walls of the lecture hall. This pedagogical strategy was adapted from my year-long ethnographic fieldwork with deaf youth participants and their families in Mexico City, Mexico.

PRESENTER(S) – Anne Pfister & David Wilson

BIOGRAPHY

Anne E. Pfister is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology. She used visual methods, including photovoice, to investigate identity and language socialization among deaf youth in Mexico City, Mexico. This community-based project actively engages participants as co-researchers and extends her involvement in the Mexican deaf community with whom she has been associated for over nine years. Pfister’s other research interests include medicalization, treatment seeking, research with children and families, and applied anthropology. Pfister has taught students of various ages in Colorado, Arizona, Mexico, and Florida.

Dave Wilson has been working in Higher Education to support faculty with their teaching research and service, since 2000. During that time he’s worked on a diverse set of projects using a wide set of skills. He currently focuses on media, online survey support, data management, and data visualization.

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THE USE OF PROTOCOLS FOR DYNAMIC DISCUSSION


ABSTRACT

Educators are continually looking for ways to engage students in richer discussions, to encourage critical reading, and to illicit different opinions from their students, and create equity in their classrooms (McDonald, Zydney, Dicter, & McDonald, 2012). This is challenging to achieve in the classroom for a variety of reasons including that some students do not feel comfortable contributing to discussions, and may be difficult to break down barriers so students can trust one another in order to effectively communicate about sensitive topics. Protocols are particularly useful in online environments where students often feel more isolated and disconnected from one another (Hewitt, 2003). Additional challenges in online learning may also include low levels of critical thinking (Marino, Feldman, & Greenwald, 2007; Wang & Chen, 2008) and limited interaction among students (Wang & Chen, 2008). It is critical that we continue to find solutions to address these challenges. Prompts, such as protocols, help students feel more connected, increase student interaction, and creating deeper discussions for higher-level thinking. This presentation will highlight protocols for discussion, and demonstrate how they can be used in an interactive discussion tool called Voicethread. Voicethread provides an interactive experience where commenting via voice or video is made possible.

PRESENTER(S) – Suzanne Ehrlich

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Ehrlich’s research includes examining American Sign Language instruction using videoconferencing technology, integration of e-learning technologies in interpreter education curricula, and the use of online protocols to improve discussion. Her most recent research includes use of iPad technology to bridge access to interpreting services for post-secondary students titled “Innovative Use of iPads as a Key to Learning in Postsecondary Classrooms”, Dr. Ehrlich has presented nationally and internationally on the topics of e-learning and educational technology integration. Her most recent publication includes a co-edited volume, titled Interpreter Education in the Digital Age.

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